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How to Copyright Your Puppets  (Read 28960 times)
StiqPuppet Productions
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2009, 09:33:33 pm »

Here is a GREAT post (okay I am a little bias) on a product inventor who discusses stuff on copyright with new products.  If you have any questions just write him and he will discuss it for you.....his info is great and put simply for the layman to understand.

http://puppetsandstuff.com/community/index.php/topic,4230.msg37969.html#msg37969

Hope this helps.....

Daryl H
Puppet_Dude
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2009, 10:23:11 pm »

Copyright is a slippery slope in some cases. Just because you say that you created something doesn't mean that you did. The issue with copyright is to be able to prove that something is yours.
We have all seen the calvin and hobbs knock offs on the back of truck windows where calvin is doing unsanitary functions on ford symbols, college mascots, etc. This is not copyright enfringement because they change it just enough to say that it isn't Calvin. If you create a character that resembles kermit the frog, there is no copyright on the puppet itself, so if your intent is not to create a Kermit puppet, then you are not in violation. However, the character of Kermit is a trademark and, should your puppet look like kermit and have a name like Hermit the frog (Kermit's brother) then you would be in violation of trademark. Just creating something in today's society doesn't neccessarily mean that you own it. Someone else could say that they created it and if you can't legitimately prove that you created it before them, they can then sue you for copyright infringement on your own creation. Also, if someone likes a character that you have created and they find out that you do not have a trademark or copyright on it, then they can jump through the neccessary hoops to get a trademark or copyright on your creation and it now becomes theirs because they have the copyright and you do not. This doesn't happen too often, but it can. Many industries have done this to "aquire". Even in my main industry of engraving, laser engravers have been designing on brick for years and about 8 years ago, a company decided to take out a copyright on the process, so now other engravers have to pay for licensing to use a laser for engraving on brick. You do not need an official copyright, but you need to have the ability to prove that it is yours should something arise. Heaven forbid you are doing a show somewhere and someone in the audience takes your character and makes a t.v. show out of it and they make millions and then turn around and tell you that you have to stop using your creation in your show because it is too close to the character that they have.
miguel
No Avatar
« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2009, 06:34:51 am »

Thanks guys for share such a great information on this matter! Wao, what we have to learn in every aspect of life (Included hobbies)
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