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Loose Jaw Puppets?  (Read 3085 times)
Animal31
« on: November 11, 2011, 05:21:31 pm »

Has anyone made a "loose jaw" puppet, such as Grover or Fozzie? What is the difference in the steps or patterns to do something like this?


Thanks!
Shawn Sorrell
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2011, 08:07:59 am »

Ok I have to admit it. I don't think I've ever heard the term "loose jaw".  I am not sure there is a difference between them and say the other Muppets.

The only thing I can think of is that when it comes to the foam structure on the inside you do not have one complete piece. The foam for the lower jaw would not be attached to the upper jaw and head piece. The fabric covering is what keeps the two sections "together" and this would perhaps allow for some unique movement. The thing is you still need to have the connection of the two within the mouth plate.
JFP
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2011, 08:53:09 am »

the "project puppet" patterns are what popped into my head when i was reading the description. (like Shawn said with the two pieces that are connected by the mouth plate) it's a great place to start, then you can customize to make your own designs.

Kimberly
Billy D. Fuller
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2011, 09:17:35 am »

Flexible materials like gasket rubber or hinging the mouth plates with a flexible fabric might help the mouth plate to have more movement. Verna finely sews her mouth plates together and has quite a bit of movement. You can practice with different materials to see what works best for you.
CJ Puppets
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2011, 07:00:10 pm »

Gasket rubber RULES!!!
Animal31
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2011, 08:53:51 am »

Sorry, "loose jaw" was the term I had heard before. It is a separate jaw, but it's not the flexibility of the materials I am questioning, it was the movement side to side. I used Grover as an example because it it much more noticeable in him, but Animal I believe also uses this technique...

I was just wondering how much more space I have to give in both pattern and mouth, and if it's all held together by the mouth material alone or if there are straps inside the mouth.
Billy D. Fuller
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2011, 10:13:17 am »

Sorry, "loose jaw" was the term I had heard before. It is a separate jaw, but it's not the flexibility of the materials I am questioning, it was the movement side to side. I used Grover as an example because it it much more noticeable in him, but Animal I believe also uses this technique...

I was just wondering how much more space I have to give in both pattern and mouth, and if it's all held together by the mouth material alone or if there are straps inside the mouth.

Again you are going to have to play it by ear LOL or in this case mouth. I generally leave about 1/2" to3/4" (I use my  finger as a guide) between the two mouth plates. Some folks use a pencil so it is a personal choice.
To get that side to side action you need to use a flexible hinge. I would then use a fabric with a bit of stretch to cover the mouth plate like a two way or four way stretch fabric. I'm no expert at this and this is just a suggestion.
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