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3D-printed puppet parts  (Read 180750 times)
Tioh
« Reply #120 on: February 07, 2015, 04:10:33 am »

Tested.com visited Jim Henson's Creature Shop, Peter Brooke shows a big 3d-printed eyelid ... and talks about how much work it was to make it.
Interesting, as I never worked for them or gave them a license to use my model commercially. The surface of the eyelid was changed (I don't know if they did that before of after the print). Everything else in the print matches my model perfectly and the model has some very odd angles and edges. At the moment I'm not sure wether I should be flattered or pissed off.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQyWTivri1g&t=12m56s
http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:198945

So just for future reference:
I release my model for free under Creative Commons - Attribution - Non-Commercial license.

If you want to use one of the models commercially you have to get a license (that means: "just ask me" - I won't ask for money if you want to sell just one or two puppets based on my models).
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 09:26:36 am by Tioh »
Tioh
« Reply #121 on: February 07, 2015, 04:06:40 pm »

The newly printed big eyelid made it easier to record some videos.

How the Bowden-cable is attached to the 3d-printed eyelid:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rYOk3_nyj5U

LED-lights inside the eye:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvmIoNavO5I
Tioh
« Reply #122 on: February 18, 2015, 02:38:50 pm »

I made a new model for movable puppet eyes. It's more robust and easier to install LEDs.


« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 09:27:34 am by Tioh »
Tioh
« Reply #123 on: February 21, 2015, 04:39:34 pm »

Simple base-element for a puppet-stand.

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:692872
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 09:28:04 am by Tioh »
Andrew
« Reply #124 on: February 23, 2015, 02:50:59 pm »

Tested.com visited Jim Henson's Creature Shop, Peter Brooke shows a big 3d-printed eyelid ... and talks about how much work it was to make it.
Interesting, as I never worked for them or gave them a license to use my model commercially. The surface of the eyelid was changed (I don't know if they did that before of after the print). Everything else in the print matches my model perfectly and the model has some very odd angles and edges. At the moment I'm not sure wether I should be flattered or pissed off.

So just for future reference:

I release my model for free under Creative Commons - Attribution - Non-Commercial license.

If you want to use one of the models commercially you have to get a license (that means: "just ask me" - I won't ask for money if you want to sell just one or two puppets based on my models).

This is one of those issues that's going to become a problem with 3D printing. It's entirely possible that they sculpted the eyelid in Zbrush (it has a specific texture they wanted) and also it had to fit the plastic sphere they're working with, but that base looks almost identical. Considering how widely Thingiverse is used, it would be hard to believe someone spontaneously thought of an identical one.

Something to consider is that although your file was licensed under Creative Commons, a physical device isn't covered by copyright in the United States, only patents. I'm not an expert, but it seems inappropriate to me to license 3D designs under CC. There's really no case law on this (to my knowledge), so it's sort of uncharted legal territory (also, note, I am not a lawyer). If you design something for 3D printers and want to protect it orprevent commercial use, you have to file a patent. Most designers who are concerned about commercial use of their 3D designs file patents so they can enforce their rights.

The other challenge is that various puppet/doll eye mechanisms like this were patented over 100 years ago so unless there is a truly innovative aspect to the mechanism it might not be possible to protect it in the U.S. Personally, if I didn't want something used commercially I would not release it as a 3D file on Thingiverse.

You know "Peepers" are patented (the specific plastic device that fits on your hand, not the general concept of eyeballs on hands) and lots of people infringe that patent, some have even had legal action taken against them. There are actually 3D designs for Peepers on Thingiverse, which is absolutely patent infringement.

It's crappy to take something under a CC-BY-NC license and use it commercially. I've had lots of people distribute patterns and other materials I've created and licensed under CC without attribution. I think many people are ignorant about Creative Commons or just don't check.

I really appreciate all the work you've done on puppetry and 3D printing Tioh, you're pioneering new ground. I know several people who appreciate it too and I hope this experience won't put you off sharing work in the future.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2015, 02:59:52 pm by Andrew »
Na
No Avatar
« Reply #125 on: February 23, 2015, 07:05:02 pm »

It's crappy to take something under a CC-BY-NC license and use it commercially. I've had lots of people distribute patterns and other materials I've created and licensed under CC without attribution. I think many people are ignorant about Creative Commons or just don't check.


In my experience, people I've talked to about copyrights either don't know or don't care. The majority are in the "don't know" pile where they usually don't understand anything about copyrights, how they work, or why they matter. The smaller percentage are in the "don't care" category where they know about copyrights, but think it doesn't affect anyone if it's infringed upon, so they don't care if they do infringe upon it; some of these people are free-marketeers who think copyrights are too restrictive upon people's ability to use what they want to use. The internet makes it much harder to get people to understand that yes, it does affect people and yes it does matter.

I agree with Andrew: if you don't want it used commercially, don't post it. And even though I don't do it myself, I'm grateful that you've been sharing them Tioh. I learn a lot just by reading your stuff.
Tioh
« Reply #126 on: February 24, 2015, 10:42:00 am »

...It's entirely possible that they sculpted the eyelid in Zbrush (it has a specific texture they wanted) and also it had to fit the plastic sphere they're working with, but that base looks almost identical. Considering how widely Thingiverse is used, it would be hard to believe someone spontaneously thought of an identical one. ...
I wrote a e-mail to Peter Brooke and got a reply. It was a remix of my model and he didn't know somebody had downloaded the model. I gave them permission to use the model for free (only the eyelid was used, the base-plate was replaced by custom bracket, milled out of aluminum). I'm happy.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2015, 10:45:01 am by Tioh »
Tioh
« Reply #127 on: February 26, 2015, 11:24:10 am »

Two simple horns:

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:699869

Plate for cable controlled animatronics (tails,...):

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:699889
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 09:29:31 am by Tioh »
Andrew
« Reply #128 on: February 26, 2015, 12:12:15 pm »

Oh that's awesome Tioh. Cable control plates are so useful.
Na
No Avatar
« Reply #129 on: February 26, 2015, 07:37:39 pm »

I wrote a e-mail to Peter Brooke and got a reply. It was a remix of my model and he didn't know somebody had downloaded the model. I gave them permission to use the model for free (only the eyelid was used, the base-plate was replaced by custom bracket, milled out of aluminum). I'm happy.


Glad to hear that not only did you get a response, but an ending you're happy with. So much of copyright infringement is impossible to track, police and resolve, that it's rare to discover two parties coming to an amicable agreement.
Tioh
« Reply #130 on: March 01, 2015, 12:05:13 pm »

The next part for the animatronic tail:

This parts clips in the plate - no glue required.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 09:40:40 am by Tioh »
Tioh
« Reply #131 on: March 01, 2015, 12:16:43 pm »

I tried to summarize some of the things I learned about 3d-printing in this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaKjE-vxpkY
Snail
« Reply #132 on: March 01, 2015, 01:37:37 pm »

This is so great that you shared your expertise and explained your journey there.  I was surprised that so many nylon types did not work but glad you found reliable one. Your skull was much more flexible than I imagined and that tail is so awesome. I love that you made little parts to make it better. Thank you for taking the time to share with us!
Shawn Sorrell
« Reply #133 on: March 02, 2015, 09:39:11 am »

Wow it looks like 3d printing is an art form all it's own!  While I doubt I'll ever do any 3d printing I watched the video and it looks like some really good tips!  Thanks for sharing and giving back to the community!
Tioh
« Reply #134 on: March 02, 2015, 11:33:17 am »

I was surprised that so many nylon types did not work but glad you found reliable one. Your skull was much more flexible than I imagined and that tail is so awesome.
The filament that caused the problems was PLA, not Nylon. The skull is made of Nylon - the PLA-prints are rigid.
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