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3D-printed puppet parts  (Read 168737 times)
Shawn Sorrell
« Reply #165 on: July 19, 2015, 07:03:49 am »

I like him. Looking forward to seeing end results.
Chris Arveson
« Reply #166 on: July 19, 2015, 08:57:59 am »

The fur covering helps a lot. It's just a personal thing with me, but the previous pics just left me with a creepy skull/skeleton type feeling. Nothing wrong with your work, it really is great.

Adding on the covering gives me a much better feel to what the character might be. Well done.
Tioh
« Reply #167 on: July 21, 2015, 02:24:12 pm »

I made a nose for the cat head.

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:936028
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 09:48:04 am by Tioh »
Tioh
« Reply #168 on: September 07, 2015, 04:09:14 pm »

A canine toon: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1002898


I did not include a model for the lower jaw because It's faster to make one with an aluminium-profile when to print it. I just bend an aluminium rod and sculpt the teeth with Plaast (from http://www.plaast.de/) around it.


I printed this model in PLA and used Plaast to glue the three parts together.

The model is currently scaled for costume size and fits my head - you have to scale it down for a puppet.
This model was not made for animatronic eyelids - the shape of the eyes works best with a sheet of white plastic for the eyes - just paint the iris and pupil.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 09:48:33 am by Tioh »
davidnagel
« Reply #169 on: September 25, 2015, 07:13:46 am »

Impressive! I wondered when 3d printing might get involved in this sort of thing.

And presuming this hasn't been discussed previously, do you not find that this sort of puppet building where things are more or less perfectly symmetrical decreases a puppets uniqueness? For example, I'd wager that all the hand made puppets in the world don't look right mirrored and having a 3d model that can be perfectly symmetrical, does it decrease the character in that character?

What are you thoughts? Others are welcome!
Tioh
« Reply #170 on: September 25, 2015, 01:36:40 pm »

Impressive! I wondered when 3d printing might get involved in this sort of thing.

And presuming this hasn't been discussed previously, do you not find that this sort of puppet building where things are more or less perfectly symmetrical decreases a puppets uniqueness? For example, I'd wager that all the hand made puppets in the world don't look right mirrored and having a 3d model that can be perfectly symmetrical, does it decrease the character in that character?

What are your thoughts? Others are welcome!

The finished heads are not perfectly symmetrical. The sides of the 3d-model were not mirrored - I place the points without measuring. Also, the fake-fur is trimmed by hand.


A neural expression makes it easier to use a puppet for more when one role.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 09:49:14 am by Tioh »
Snail
« Reply #171 on: September 28, 2015, 07:02:02 pm »

So does the lighter skeleton make the overall puppet lighter and easier to move or about the same weight?
Tioh
« Reply #172 on: September 29, 2015, 05:04:21 am »

So does the lighter skeleton make the overall puppet lighter and easier to move or about the same weight?
The weight of the 3d-printed heads is not much different to the heads that I made with other materials. I managed to make them about 20-40g lighter - not much, but it does make a difference in a 2 hour live show.
Snail
« Reply #173 on: September 30, 2015, 07:10:33 pm »

2 hours! ouch!  I guess every little bit would help, you must have great muscles on your arms.  Maybe you can print out some sort of arm support system to help you go longer or a way to displace some of the weight to other parts of your body. That would be awesome.  I love your work, thanks for showing us.
mrbumblepants
« Reply #174 on: October 02, 2015, 09:15:25 pm »

I have been wondering how light a puppet can be made with 3d printing. I'd imagine eventually we'll get materials so light that we'll only need the strength to hold a hand in the air.

Sent from my X7 using Tapatalk

Tioh
« Reply #175 on: October 07, 2015, 10:34:22 am »

I have been wondering how light a puppet can be made with 3d printing. I'd imagine eventually we'll get materials so light that we'll only need the strength to hold a hand in the air.
...
A friend of mine tried making some models with two component foam (you can buy the chemicals to make extremely light foam) and used 3d-printed molds to make the parts. The downside is that the chemicals are expensive, cannot be stored for a long time and are extremely toxic while working with them. I do not have a workshop - so I have never tried that myself.

Another friend tried to make a very light 3d-model and used Shapeways to print it (it's a mesh-like structure - super light and flexible) - expensive, but far beyond what my 3d-printer can make. The structure was a bit too thin and did break.

I have not found very light filaments for my 3d-printer and the models require at least 2mm wall thickness to be strong enough. Good fake fur or anthron fleece does also add a lot to the weight.
mrbumblepants
« Reply #176 on: October 09, 2015, 04:08:06 am »

I have been thinking of light structures. Would open up options or decorating, also full body puppets.

I will look into those chemicals. The place I'm joining might be able to handle them, if i get the chance to acquire them.

Sent from my X7 using Tapatalk

Tioh
« Reply #177 on: November 14, 2015, 12:36:42 pm »

I released a new 3d-model for a canine nose:

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1131844

It is also available on Shapeways: http://shpws.me/KMBY
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 09:49:49 am by Tioh »
mrbumblepants
« Reply #178 on: December 04, 2015, 08:11:12 pm »

A friend of mine tried making some models with two component foam (you can buy the chemicals to make extremely light foam) and used 3d-printed molds to make the parts. The downside is that the chemicals are expensive, cannot be stored for a long time and are extremely toxic while working with them. I do not have a workshop - so I have never tried that myself.

Another friend tried to make a very light 3d-model and used Shapeways to print it (it's a mesh-like structure - super light and flexible) - expensive, but far beyond what my 3d-printer can make. The structure was a bit too thin and did break.

I have not found very light filaments for my 3d-printer and the models require at least 2mm wall thickness to be strong enough. Good fake fur or anthron fleece does also add a lot to the weight.

The makerspace I just joined has a printer that sculpts out of paper. It's not technically 3d printing, since it deducts material rather than adds it - but I think it's gonna be a great solution. Paper is super cheap, and the end product both looks good and is very light-weight.
Tioh
« Reply #179 on: December 05, 2015, 03:01:30 am »

The makerspace I just joined has a printer that sculpts out of paper. It's not technically 3d printing, since it deducts material rather than adds it - but I think it's gonna be a great solution. Paper is super cheap, and the end product both looks good and is very light-weight.
Most layered paper 3D printers are very slow and do not produce water-/sweat-proof models. I know someone that uses paper-models for vacuum forming - that produces really lightweight shells.
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