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Avenue Q puppet Hire Uk only £795  (Read 10574 times)
Andrew
« Reply #15 on: August 09, 2014, 07:51:58 am »

I think the difference with the famous Coca-Cola Santa ads by Norman Rockwell are that they were at least partially inspired by pre-existing folk traditions. Also, under the U.S. copyright laws of the `20s and `30s, if they were not properly registered with the U.S. copyright office they may very likely be in the public domain (I believe a lot of Rockwell's work is, but again, I'm not a lawyer). Coke wouldn't enjoy trademark protection either if they never filed for it.

Of course, that's why companies like Disney will sue a Daycare Centre that uses Mickey Mouse on their wall, and Toho Studios aggressively goes after people making commercials with Godzilla-like monsters. I think it's trickier for American works made before the 1970s because copyright protection didn't used to be automatic. I'm not very familiar with the European or Australian laws.

Na
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« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2014, 07:02:59 pm »

I think the difference with the famous Coca-Cola Santa ads by Norman Rockwell are that they were at least partially inspired by pre-existing folk traditions. Also, under the U.S. copyright laws of the `20s and `30s, if they were not properly registered with the U.S. copyright office they may very likely be in the public domain (I believe a lot of Rockwell's work is, but again, I'm not a lawyer). Coke wouldn't enjoy trademark protection either if they never filed for it.

Of course, that's why companies like Disney will sue a Daycare Centre that uses Mickey Mouse on their wall, and Toho Studios aggressively goes after people making commercials with Godzilla-like monsters. I think it's trickier for American works made before the 1970s because copyright protection didn't used to be automatic. I'm not very familiar with the European or Australian laws.



True, I didn't think of that. I think overall copyrights are the same here or in Europe, in that there is a lifetime-of-artist + X number of years before it goes into public domain. The X is what is usually different, anywhere from 50 to 100 years or so. The average IIRC is about 70 years. So yeah, a lot of the early works will be in public domain due to age, or slow release due to those X number of years. It's also why copyrights over countries is tricky: a work can become public domain earlier in one country than in another.

Another reason why talking to a lawyer is always better. It's just far too complicated otherwise.
Andrew
« Reply #17 on: August 09, 2014, 08:08:09 pm »

Exactly. I looked in to doing something based on the Little Prince a few years ago. The problem I discovered is that while the book is in the public domain here in Canada and many other countries, it isn't in Europe, the U.S. or Australia. The famous illustrations by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry are technically in the public domain, but you cannot exploit them commercially because they have been trademarked by the publisher. You also have to be very careful which English translation of the book you use; the original translation is public domain, but most of the current editions have a newer translation that is copyrighted.

There is actually an approved stage adaptation of the Little Prince that can be licensed. Presumably you can use the Antoine de Saint-Exupéry designs for that since with that property (unlike Avenue Q) all the rights are held by the same party.

Na
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« Reply #18 on: August 09, 2014, 09:42:47 pm »

Yep, had the same problem myself a while back:
http://puppetsandstuff.com/community/index.php/topic,7191.0.html

I will admit that copyrights could do with some reforming so it's less confusing, but at the same time I'm not sure how that would work in keeping with the idea that copyrights are used with the artist's wishes: here in Aus. we even have a concept of 'moral' rights, where a creator can argue that a license should/not be granted depending on whether the work is going to be used in a manner in keeping with the moral concerns of said creator. Ie. in the case where you may not want to have your work used by a political organisation you don't support.

It would be really great if there were a copyright lawyer out there who could occasionally pop by for these discussions Wink
Andrew
« Reply #19 on: August 10, 2014, 12:22:30 am »

We have something similar in Canada. There is a famous sculpture/installation in one of Toronto's malls, The Eaton Centre, of Canadian Geese in flight. One year the mall thought it would be cute to put wreaths around their necks. The artist sued because he said it destroyed his original intention and won.
Na
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« Reply #20 on: August 11, 2014, 01:33:59 am »

See, this is what I find weird... What original intention is there to flying geese? I can kind of understand if there was a religious complaint, like I don't know, not wanting your work associated with a religion you don't believe in (even that I find kind of odd) or pursuing secularism in public artwork... but sometimes things are just silly.
Andrew
« Reply #21 on: August 11, 2014, 07:54:35 am »

Well, I probably didn't explain the circumstances very well. Robert Snow (the artist) is one of the most important contemporary artists in the world and the work, which is called Flightstop, was a commissioned sculpture. The owner of the Mall wanted the prestige of a Robert Snow work in the mall (the Eaton Centre was something of an architectural marvel when it opened in the 1970s). In Canada, any modification to a painting, sculpture or engraving is deemed to prejudice the author. The mall knew it was buying a work of art from a highly respected artist. If they had just picked up ornamental geese from a store somewhere and hung them up they probably could have done whatever they wanted with them.

There is actually an Wikipedia article about the case at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_v._The_Eaton_Centre_Ltd.
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